Quat Sanitizers and Cotton Rags

Quat Sanitizers and Cotton Rags

Quat Sanitizers and Cotton Rags

When sanitizing dining tables in a cafeteria it is common for the staff to use a designated sanitizer bucket with a quat based sanitizer. They will generally use a rag or sponge to wipe the tables and then keep the rag or sponge in the sanitizing solution for future use.

The issue that arises is that if the rag is made of cotton it will absorb the quat based sanitizer into the rag. This minimizes the ability of the solution to sanitize the table tops that is necessary to prevent bacteria from creating a health risk.

To prevent the rag from absorbing the quat based sanitizer we suggest using microfiber rags. Microfiber rags will NOT absorb the quat like cotton. You can also use a ready to use sanitizer to spray the surface prior to wiping. This eliminates the need for the sanitizer bucket and the issues associated with rags absorbing the quat based sanitizers all together.

Please share this with your customers to help prevent the dreaded check mark on the Health Inspectors report.

How many coats of floor finish?

How many coats of floor finish?

How many coats of finish do I need to lay on my floor?

This is a question we receive periodically from end users that does not really have a black and white answer. In some cases we might ask what the gloss expectation is, in other cases it might be what type of maintenance will be provided on the floor.

The most consistent answer that we can give is the “Rule of 100”. The “Rule of 100” proposes that you take a look at the percentage of solids of the finish and divide 100 by the percentage. So for example if the finish has a 25% solids you divide 100 by 25 and you come up with 4 coats of finish for the floor. If the solids content of the finish is 19-20% you would divide 100 by 20 and it would let you know that you should use 5 coats of finish on the floor.

This practice is designed to allow for cleaning the floor which can remove some of the finish without exposing the bare floor to be damaged or stained.

Removing Blood from Fabric

Removing Blood from Fabric

What is the best way to remove blood from fabric?

This is a call we receive periodically, and talk about in our Laundry Training class. When dealing with blood in fabric there are several concerns to be aware of. First is how to remove the blood, but second is how we handle the item that has blood on it.

When dealing with bodily fluids we must use precautions and proper PPE to insure we do not place the person laundering the fabric at risk of blood borne pathogens. Please follow OSHA requirements for Occupational Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogens.

Once the items containing blood are delivered to the laundry we can remove the blood in one of two ways. If the blood stains are occurring on a frequent basis and the volume is fairly high we can address the removal of blood in the laundry formula for the commercial washers. We do this by adding a cold water flush to the beginning of the laundry cycle. This prevents the hot water from setting the stains into the fabric and making it much more difficult to deal with. If the blood is a once in a while event we can rinse or soak the item in cold water to remove the blood.

The key here is to identify the blood before washing so we can use the correct process to remove the blood without setting the stain in the fabric.

Chlorine Bleach Presoak?

Chlorine Bleach Presoak?

Is chlorine bleach a good presoak for (flatware, coffee cups, laundry stains, etc.)?

This is an observation we make over time when visiting customer locations. Chlorine bleach is a common product to encounter in multiple uses at a variety of locations. We have seen it used as a presoak for stained fabric in laundries, we have seen it used to remove coffee stains from the inside of coffee cups, we have had food service facilities use chlorine as a presoak for their flatware, and we have even witnessed people washing their floors with chlorine bleach.

Chlorine is a very popular product for several applications. It can be used as a sanitizer in low temp dish machines and 3 compartment sinks, it can be used as a destainer in commercial laundry operations, but it is not a good choice when soil and other conditions are present.

First of all, chlorine bleach is an aggressive chemical that can start to deteriorate the surface of anything it comes into contact with. It does not have any cleaning ability, and it can not sanitize a dirty surface. There are many products that are better suited for removing stains. If the stains are present in the laundry we would suggest using a prespotter or presoak.
If the stains are present in coffee cups or other plastic food contact surfaces we would suggest using an oxygen based presoak to remove the stains without harming the surface. For flatware, there are several presoaks in both a liquid and powder format that will breakdown the food soils very quickly and efficiently without causing any damage to the flatware. And for floors, we have a large variety of floor cleaning products to choose from depending on the floor type and location.

As I mentioned earlier, chlorine is a good choice for low temp dish machines. As a matter of fact, chlorine is the only approved sanitizer for low temp dish machines because it will not foam. However there are many other product alternatives for cleaning surfaces in both the food service industry and in the laundry that will provide much better results without damaging the surfaces to be cleaned.

Pet Friendly Cleaning

Pet Friendly Cleaning

Here is a call we received a while back. “Will using a general purpose cleaner to clean my carpets harm me or my pets”? When cleaning carpeting we recommend using approved carpet cleaners and following the label directions for use.

That being said, we cannot control what people decide to use when cleaning carpets or other surfaces. In this case a woman hired a carpet cleaning company to clean the carpets in her apartment building. The carpet cleaning company used a general purpose cleaner as a carpet spotter and a carpet cleaner. The general purpose cleaner contained surfactants, alkalinity, and solvents, which in most cases is an excellent choice for removing tough soils on “non-porous surfaces”.

Because the general purpose cleaner contained alkalinity it could potentially be a concern for anyone or their pet who come into contact with that carpet. Alkalinity can cause burns to the skin and can be serious if it comes into contact with the mouth or eyes of people or animals.

In this case, because the general purpose cleaner was already on the floor, we suggested using the carpet extractor with fresh water to rinse the carpet repeatedly until there was no residual general purpose cleaner left on the carpet.

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At the end of the day there were no injuries to people or pets, or damage to the carpet. But in the future we recommend using appropriate carpet cleaners and carpet pretreatment products.

Washing New Linen

Washing new linen

One of the more peculiar issues that comes up from time to time is when we get a call from the field asking “why when they have washed a load of new linen that the whole load comes out a light green, or light blue, or light yellow color”?

Due to a majority of the new linen used in today’s hospitality environment originating in India, Pakistan, Egypt, and other foreign countries, we must be aware that they will use harsh chemicals to prevent mold and mildew on the fabric, and pesticides to prevent bugs from infiltrating the fabric during the long shipping process in cargo containers.

That being said, if the new linen is washed for the first time in a standard formula with Break, Suds, Destainer, Sour, and Softener it has a tendency to turn a light shade of green, blue, or yellow.

The best way to prevent this from happening is to wash the new linen in a formula with only a suds type product. The alkalinity, and acidity of the other products reacts with the harsh chemicals to cause the color change, by adding nothing more than suds to the new linen formula you can remove those harsh chemicals and prevent the discoloration.

Every facility, whether a hotel, motel, or healthcare, should use this type of new linen formula to prevent the shock of having all of the new linen change color when washing it for the first time.

On a side note, if the facility has washed their new linen and it has changed color all is not lost. By washing the fabric a second time in the appropriate formula based on the fabric type it will remove the discoloration from the fabric.